Core Ensemble

Julia Cavallaro

© Teresa Tam Photography

© Teresa Tam Photography

Praised for her “pure and lovely tone” (Boston Musical Intelligencer), Julia Cavallaro is a versatile singer with a passion for early repertoire. Recent roles and solo engagements include the Sorceress in Purcell’s Dido & Aeneas and the alto solos in Handel’s Messiah and Bach’s Mass in G Minor. She has appeared in operas and concerts with the Handel and Haydn Society, Boston Early Music Festival, Boston Modern Orchestra Project, Boston Landmarks Orchestra, Amherst Early Music Festival, and Harvard Early Music Society. She also performs frequently with several Boston-based chamber ensembles, including Musical Offering, Canto Armonico, Schola Cantorum, Seven Times Salt, and Zefiro. Julia sings for Sunday services at First Church of Christ Scientist, Belmont and FCCS, Cambridge, and is a regular substitute chorister at Church of the Advent, Trinity Church, and Emmanuel Church. She received her master’s degree from Boston University and bachelor’s degree from Harvard College.

 

Sarah Darling

Violist and violinist Sarah Darling enjoys a varied musical career that spans many centuries and styles. Sarah studied at Harvard, Juilliard, Amsterdam, and Freiburg (as a recipient of the Beebe, Paine, and DAAD grants), and is currently finishing a doctorate at New England Conservatory with Kim Kashkashian. She holds a variety of leading and directorial roles with A Far Cry, Boston Baroque, the Harvard Baroque Chamber Orchestra, Musicians of the Old Post Road, Les Bostonades, and the Arcturus Ensemble. She also performs with the Boston Early Music Festival, Carmel Bach Festival, Emmanuel Music, the Bach Ensemble, and Tafelmusik, and has recorded old and new music for Naxos, Linn, Paladino, Azica, MSR, and Centaur Records. As a chamber musician, Sarah has performed in the Ravinia, Lucerne, Larzac, Sarasota, and Yellow Barn festivals and has collaborated with members of the Juilliard, Takacs, Borromeo, Ying, Orion, and Cleveland quartets. Sarah has been praised for her “excellent solos” (Boston Globe), “absolute concentration and astonishing precision” (Badischer Zeitung), “sympathy and spirit” (Hub Review) and “agility in coaxing a variety of grunts, groans, and creaks from the viola.” (Boston Musical Intelligencer.) For a list of upcoming musical adventures, visit www.sarahdarling.net.


Matthew Hall

© Teresa Tam Photography

© Teresa Tam Photography

Matthew Hall performs frequently in and around Boston as a solo harpsichord and organ recitalist and with the chamber ensemble Musical Offering. He is a frequent guest with the Montréal-based Ensemble 1729.

His interpretation of Bach has been praised as a “beautifully virtuosic soliloquy” delivered with “perfect elegance and control” (Arts First Review). He has also received praise for his “lively…and adventurous” playing (Boston Musical Intelligencer) and his “wonderful understanding of the subtlety and expressive potential of the French style” (Arts Boston).

In addition to his performing activities, Matthew is also the founder and executive director of Ad Parnassum, Inc., a non-profit organization which seeks to engage the public in early music and other classical music idioms in ways that go beyond the traditional concert-going experience, concerns which were fostered through his teaching at The Cambridge Center for Adult Education. As a freelance writer Matthew has contributed to Harpsichord & Fortepiano magazine and Early Music Performer. He also worked as an editorial assistant at the Packard Humanities Institute, Cambridge, publishers of C.P.E. Bach: The Complete Works.

Matthew studied music and linguistics at Harvard, completed a master’s degree in musicology at the University of Leeds (UK) on a Fulbright Scholarship while holding an Organ Scholarship at Leeds Cathedral, and completed a second master’s degree in harpsichord and organ performance under Peter Sykes at Boston University. He is now a Ph.D. candidate in musicology at Cornell University. His research interests are diverse: he has published work on 17th- and 18th-century topics, particularly keyboard studies, and is currently pursuing a project to collect and interpret new biographical information on the 15th-century composer Antoine Brumel. He also cultivates an expertise in 17th- and 18th-century French language, rhetoric, and declamatory style, especially as these inform musical interpretation. His recitations of Classic French texts have been called “luscious” (Boston Musical Intelligencer).


Shirley Hunt

© Sheila Newberry

© Sheila Newberry

Noted for her stylish interpretations, luminescent stage presence, and ambitious collection of musical projects, cellist Shirley Hunt brings fierce imagination and integrity to music of the Renaissance, Baroque, 20th and 21st centuries. Equally at home on baroque and modern cello as well as the viola da gamba, Shirley embraces an astonishingly eclectic life as a multi-instrumentalist and collaborator. In addition to championing historical and contemporary art music, she improvises, plays jazz, and writes string arrangements.

A recipient of the Voices of Music Young Artist Award, Shirley holds degrees from Northwestern University and the University of Southern California, where her principal teachers were Hans Jensen, Ronald Leonard, and Mary Springfels. She has been an artist-in-residence at the Banff Centre for the Arts, has served as a Visiting Teaching Artist at California Institute of the Arts, and has given master classes at Cornish College of the Arts, Willamette University, and the Oakwood Academy of Creative Education. She can be heard on the NCA and Origin Classics labels as well as on numerous pop/rock albums and feature film soundtracks.

Current projects include a complete recording of the cello suites and viola da gamba sonatas of J.S. Bach; performing and recording with chamber-jazz quintet Douglas Detrick's AnyWhen Ensemble; and Bradamante, a duo collaboration with cellist Elinor Frey combining poetry, theater, and music for two cellos.


Sarah Paysnick

© Teresa Tam Photography

© Teresa Tam Photography

A native of Massachusetts, flutist Sarah Paysnick is praised for "[producing] a beautifully tuned (and vibrato free) tone" (Tom Moore, Early Music America).  In addition to Musical Offering, she performs regularly with Grand Harmonie, Arcadia Players, the Berry Collective and Harvard Baroque, where she frequently appears as concerto soloist. After winning the NFA’s Baroque Artist competition in 2009, she moved to Israel for a year, where she performed with Israel's finest baroque ensembles. Upon returning to Boston, she co-founded Musical Offering and (more recently) Grand Harmonie, an ensemble dedicated to performance of 19th century music on period instruments. Performing chamber music of the Galant and early Classical periods is a passion of Sarah's with a special place in her heart for the sons of J.S. Bach.  She holds degrees from Ithaca College (BM), the University of Texas at Austin (MM), and from the Longy School of Music (GPD), where she studied with Na’ama Lion.